Beauty

Jo Malone London master perfumer shares her tips for applying fragrance

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In terms of instantly recognisable trademarks, Jo Malone London’s cream and black colour scheme is akin to Cadbury purple and Tiffany blue.

So when the Brit fragrance house temporarily discards them in place of a rainbow of watery pastels, we take notice.

The change indicates the arrival of its annual Blossoms collection, this year introducing Frangipani Flower alongside sprightly floral favourites Orange Blossom, Silk Blossom and Star Magnolia.

Master perfumer Marie Salamagne encountered frangipani on her travels to Bali, using the memory to inform the new limited edition.


What is it about blossom that excites and inspires you?

The beauty of nature every spring, the vigorous colours, its luminous. I get excited when I see the colours of flowers. I try to capture those blooming moments.


Do you have any favourite travel recollections when it comes to encountering blossom?

Capturing the Frangipani in Bali was the Blossom that I saw and loved the most; you can see the blossom everywhere.


How did you compose the new Frangipani flower scent?

I visited a garden with Celine Roux (Head of Global Product Development at Jo Malone London) to smell the Frangipani flower. We wanted to understand how we would like the fragrance to smell. We then used Head Space Technology to extract the flower for the notes.


Jo Malone Blossoms
Frangipani can be cloying. What about your composition makes it wearable
and unique?

People have this idea of Frangipani being cloying, but in reality, I don’t think it is. It’s very different, it’s much more luminous. We wanted to rediscover this fragrance and show people that the flower is still on the trees and blooming – you could almost wear the frangipani note on its own, without any other ingredients.


Which attributes do you love about the other scents in this year’s blossoms collection?

I love all of them. All of them give me happiness; when you smell them you are instantly seduced. A big part of seduction is feeling good and they make you want to dive into the fragrances.


This collection is a signifier of northern spring, however, in New Zealand, the colder months are arriving.  Do you personally prefer to use fragrance to transport yourself to another place or season, or do you like to amplify the moment/season you’re in with a scent that complements it?

The fragrances of the collection transport you, there are strong images that come to mind when you smell them. The feeling I get from the fragrances is always pleasure. I think fragrance is more of something that can transport you anywhere. It’s a trip into nature even when you’re at home. People are always talking about Blossoms, even in winter. It doesn’t seem to matter what the season is, people always look forward to the collection.


How do you embrace self-expression and individuality with fragrance?

It’s very instinctive. I think women should wear fragrance spontaneously, I think it depends on what mood you are in. It could be something fresh, darker or creamy.


Do you believe in owning a ‘signature scent’?

Yes, but you need to find it by following your instincts and experimenting a lot. I think it’s about being brave, following your own instinct rather than what is on trend and realising that your taste changes, something you didn’t like ten years ago, you might like now.


Where do you like to apply fragrance?

During the summer, I like to use a Body Crème and then spritz Cologne in my hair.


Are there any surprising or interesting trends in fragrance we should in the near future?

There is a popularity around flowers, people are looking for a more modern take on bouquet notes. Fragrances are very intense these days, it’s how you bring the luminosity to the fragrance.

Jo Malone Blossoms* This article is brought to you in partnership with Jo Malone London. The Jo Malone Blossoms colognes start from $118 (for a 30ml). The range also offers candles, hair mists and a diffuser. Available at Jo Malone stores and selected stockists.


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